God mind.

God mind.

A bit of truth for you all.

(via volcanogrrrl-deactivated2012073)

(via setfiretomybones)

Who Needs Feminism?: I need feminism because people automatically assume I’m a ‘guy’ in the...

whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because people automatically assume I’m a ‘guy’ in the MMO I play, and when I correct them I immediately get called out as a man pretending to be a woman to get attention. Then I’m supposed to prove it with pictures. Then all the guys have to tell a story about “some dumb girl”…

whoneedsfeminism:

I just… I just need feminism.  There are so many reasons.

whoneedsfeminism:

I just… I just need feminism.  There are so many reasons.

thepoliticalnotebook:

“Do you hate the Citizens United ruling and how it led to the flood of unlimited Super-PAC spending? You know it!” Check out Mother Jones’ interactive flowchart on how the Citizens United case could be taken down… 
And after you do that, read Jeffrey Toobin’s longform piece in this issue of The New Yorker: “Money Unlimited: How Chief Justice John Roberts orchestrated the Citizens United decision.” There are some fascinating details about the oral argument proceedings, the dynamics of the Roberts court and the legal evolution of corporate personhood following the passage of the 14th amendment.

In a different way, though, Citizens United is a distinctive product of the Roberts Court. The decision followed a lengthy and bitter behind-the-scenes struggle among the Justices that produced both secret unpublished opinions and a rare reargument of a case. The case, too, reflects the aggressive conservative judicial activism of the Roberts Court. It was once liberals who were associated with using the courts to overturn the work of the democratically elected branches of government, but the current Court has matched contempt for Congress with a disdain for many of the Court’s own precedents. When the Court announced its final ruling on Citizens United, on January 21, 2010, the vote was five to four and the majority opinion was written by Anthony Kennedy. Above all, though, the result represented a triumph for Chief Justice Roberts. Even without writing the opinion, Roberts, more than anyone, shaped what the Court did. As American politics assumes its new form in the post-Citizens United era, the credit or the blame goes mostly to him.

[MoJo] [TNY]

thepoliticalnotebook:

“Do you hate the Citizens United ruling and how it led to the flood of unlimited Super-PAC spending? You know it!” Check out Mother Jonesinteractive flowchart on how the Citizens United case could be taken down… 

And after you do that, read Jeffrey Toobin’s longform piece in this issue of The New Yorker: “Money Unlimited: How Chief Justice John Roberts orchestrated the Citizens United decision.” There are some fascinating details about the oral argument proceedings, the dynamics of the Roberts court and the legal evolution of corporate personhood following the passage of the 14th amendment.

In a different way, though, Citizens United is a distinctive product of the Roberts Court. The decision followed a lengthy and bitter behind-the-scenes struggle among the Justices that produced both secret unpublished opinions and a rare reargument of a case. The case, too, reflects the aggressive conservative judicial activism of the Roberts Court. It was once liberals who were associated with using the courts to overturn the work of the democratically elected branches of government, but the current Court has matched contempt for Congress with a disdain for many of the Court’s own precedents. When the Court announced its final ruling on Citizens United, on January 21, 2010, the vote was five to four and the majority opinion was written by Anthony Kennedy. Above all, though, the result represented a triumph for Chief Justice Roberts. Even without writing the opinion, Roberts, more than anyone, shaped what the Court did. As American politics assumes its new form in the post-Citizens United era, the credit or the blame goes mostly to him.

[MoJo] [TNY]

(via thepoliticalnotebook)

reuters:

Marco Avila, a reporter in Sonora, Mexico was buried over the weekend after being found in a black garbage bag. 
He’s the sixth current or former journalist killed in Mexico in less than a month. Considering the number of gruesome atrocities committed by the country’s drug cartels (the latest being the 49 decapitated, hand-less, foot-less bodies found on the side of a highway), it makes sense that the people covering the news in these areas have become targets too. 
[Photo: REUTERS/Stringer]
THE ATLANTIC WIRE: Being a journalist in Mexico can be deadly

reuters:

Marco Avila, a reporter in Sonora, Mexico was buried over the weekend after being found in a black garbage bag. 

He’s the sixth current or former journalist killed in Mexico in less than a month. Considering the number of gruesome atrocities committed by the country’s drug cartels (the latest being the 49 decapitated, hand-less, foot-less bodies found on the side of a highway), it makes sense that the people covering the news in these areas have become targets too. 

[Photo: REUTERS/Stringer]

THE ATLANTIC WIRE: Being a journalist in Mexico can be deadly

"Military soldiers beat us all the way up the street, from the bridge to the hospital. They beat us with their sticks, kicked us, and punched us. At one point there were around 10 or 15 of them beating me. They put us into vans; there were around 25 or 28 of us in one van and there were women with us. I saw soldiers hit them. Then they took us to the military police camp in Khalifa al-Maamoun, where they beat us again. My head was bleeding and my clothes were ripped by the time they brought me after that to the military prosecutor. Then they moved us to Tora prison. When we arrived there we were given a “reception party” where three plainclothes prison officials beat us and whipped us with hoses."

On May 5 military prosecutors released 16 women, and on May 10, 17 men arrested at an earlier demonstration, on grounds that they were students.  Adel Khattab was one of those released, and later told Human Rights Watch his story.

Egypt: Widespread Military Torture of Protesters Arrested in May | Human Rights Watch

(via humanrightswatch)

(via humanrightswatch)

Tracy Chapman – Fast Car (2,399 plays)

onthismindonthisheart:

Fast Car - Tracy Chapman

(Source: laughterthroughtears, via wander-luzt)

whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because I’m tired of seeing historical dramas from Rome to Mad Men portraying the sexual abuse and exploitation of women as light entertainment.

whoneedsfeminism:

I was 10 when someone first made me feel inadequate for my size. 

whoneedsfeminism:

I was 10 when someone first made me feel inadequate for my size. 

(Source: whoneedsfeminism)

Free Documentaries streamed online

scribemo:

A library of free documentaries online. Educate yourself.

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)